Community Holiday Crafting

I’ve spent the past few years embracing holiday crafting with my family. I’ve written a lot about our traditions on this blog (see “Permission to Play: Holiday Crafting Edition, “Our Craftiest Christmas to Date,” “Handmade Holidays: The Next Generation,”Holiday Crafting with Teens,” and “Holiday Crafting with PreSchooler (and Glitter!)

This year, my attention’s been turned outward. In the weeks leading up to the holidays, I’ve found myself crafting with the community more than my kin.

I attended a stitch ‘n bitch session at Wholly Craft, a handmade gift shop hosted by a local organization that supports women’s reproductive choice – Women Have Options. Ohio legislators recently passed measures to outlaw abortions past 20 weeks of conception. Women, and supportive men, throughout our state are enraged and looking for ways to move on and prepare for the challenges ahead. I attended “Felt and Feminism” to connect with women actively working to protect women and our reproductive options and make some fem-inspired XMas ornaments.

This past Sunday, I hosted a Chanukah Menorah making session as a follow-up to my last post, “Tis the Season for Solidarity.” I rented time at Paper Moon Art Studio, gathered supplies, and got some general design ideas to share. I invited a few creative friends to help me get things set up, play around with the material to imagine ways they might be used, and think through the best ways to get people started on the project. I was impressed with all the ways folks found to put the materials together that I hadn’t imagined. The event was attended by Jews and Jewish allies and at the end of the night, 16 new menorahs walked out into the world.

Finally, a friend and I hosted an Winter Solstice Eve party for some kids from school and their parents. We set the party up just after school and had snacks and crafts. Mostly the kids wound up running wild while the adults sipped spiked cider and chatted in the kitchen. But a few joined the adults poking cloves into oranges to make pomanders and cut paper snowflakes.

With all the crappy things happening in the news, I needed this time with friends (old and new) making things to give me hope that we will carry on, and we will make the world beautiful as we do so.

Happy Holidays!

Acts of LOVING Kindness

I was out of the house today attending a conference. When I got home, I found these on the kitchen counter.

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Since Cora and I started making Valentine’s last week, I’ve left the materials out on the counter in the hope that the other kids might get inspired. I didn’t expect to Dan to get in on the action. But I probably should have. He’s always loved making little love notes – for birthdays, lunch boxes, for my suitcase on business meetings.

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He told me Cora gave him some directions for his making, including on the card he made for her. Above, you can see she gave him permission to use as many gems as he wanted on her card.

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After dinner the rest of the family spontaneously accepted my Valentine invitation. As always, Cora was mesmerized by her older siblings and stayed up way past her bedtime cutting, gluing, drawing, writing, and singing along to cheesy love songs.

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Rosa got so far into the flow that she didn’t stop working for 2 1/2 hours.  She finished 14 unique cards and is looking forward to sharing them with family and friends.

I believe that actions speak louder than words, greeting cards, and even chocolate. Probably another one of those things that goes back to my Jewish upbringing where we are taught that gemilut hasadim, acts done for others out of love and compassion which tie us together as human beings, are as important as giving charitable contributions of work. We show one another our love through acts of empathy and generosity – from putting the dishes in the dishwasher to taking a moment from our busy lives to knock on a neighbor’s door and see how they’ve been. We show love through our communion.

Having my family in the kitchen all together and crafting tonight was the best Valentine I could have asked for.

Handmade Holidays: The Next Generation

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Cora’s gift for our dog, Thompson

I’ve been blogging about my family’s handmade holidays for a few years now. It’s provided me space to work through my feelings about Christmas as someone who grew up in a conservative Jewish home (see: Cultural Responsiveness Begins at Home, 2012 and Culturally Inappropriate Holiday Crafting, 2013), how to meaningfully engage the teenagers in my life (Holiday Crafting with Teens, 2014), and my relationship with glitter (Holiday Crafting with Preschoolers (and Glitter!), 2014),

As in the past, the days leading up to Christmas this year were filled with crafting activities.

Cora and her buddy Maya made some wrapping paper.

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Rosa made some paperwhite planters, at my request. (She also did some of her own crafting in her room leading me to believe she was my secret Santa. Which turns out is exactly what she wanted me to believe, even though she wasn’t my Santa. She said she was trying to mess with me, and get me prepared for a time when she might have to make something for me in secret. She’s a sneaky one…)

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Cora had some more fun with glue and glitter,

and I got hooked on Borax snowflakes (which are incredibly difficult to photograph).

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Like Rosa, George came up with his own crafting ideas this year. But, unlike his sister, he brought them down into the kitchen to work on with me. His presence was the greatest gift I got. (see Mindfully Foraging Family Time and Holiday Decorations) We spent a solid day and a half together, off and on, as he worked, asked me for advice, and critiqued my holiday music choices (turns out he’s a real traditionalist).

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Wood burning a sign for his dad.

Cora loved watching him paint a blue jay for Grandma. I was so glad they had this time together. It doesn’t happen often enough.

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After nearly a decade, I feel  certain that the future of our family’s handmade holidays is secure. And with that, I wish you and yours a Happy and a Crafty New Year.

Mindfully Foraging Family Time and Holiday Decorations

It’s no secret to those who know me well that I’ve been struggling to connect with the teenagers in my life as of late. I’m about one month into some new experiments, guided in part by The Happiness Project, by which I’m making more fervent attempts to engage them. You might read this as “force them to spend time with me.” That’s basically what it is, but I’m trying my best to prevent them from seeing it that way. (I guess it’s good neither of them actively follow this blog…)

Two weeks ago, they each got to cook dinner with me one night. They decided what we would make and I tried to get be a guide on the side, rather than the master chef. It was good time together, something Rosa and I have done a lot of (see My Step Monster’s Kitchen), just not lately. For George, it seems like a lot of our interactions come down to, “in two years this is all going to be your responsibility,” so you might call this college (or life) prep in the kitchen.

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Thanksgiving day I went out in the garden to gather some herbs. I came in with a fistful of sage, rosemary, time, and parsley. I went around the house with it inviting everyone to take a few deep cleansing breaths. Cora wanted to go out and find more and I suggested we gather some greens and things to decorate the table. Then I thought, we should all go. It was unseasonably warm – thankfully – so it didn’t take too much convincing when I gave Dan and the big kids thirty minutes to get ready for a family walk.

We wandered around the neighborhood for nearly an hour chatting, playing, singing, and foraging. We gathered dried blossoms and branches, berries, and evergreen boughs, pine cones and nuts and came home with an overflowing basket of materials to work with.

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I decided not to do anything with them right away. Instead, we waited for Dan’s mom to arrive. She is a florist so I solicited her to work on arrangements. Rosa helped and it was lovely to see this activity turn intergenerational.

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The finished product was beautiful from every seat at the table, complete with the kitcschy Pilgrims and Native Americans my mother-in-law used to use at her house. We also included a beeswax candle Rosa and I made last year at Christmas-time. (That was part of another one of my concerted efforts to spend time with the teens which I documented in “Holiday Crafting with Teens.”)

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Just after Thanksgiving the latest edition of Rodale’s Organic Life came to the house complete with an article on foraged holiday crafts and decorations. And just like that, I had ideas for next time.

 

Paper Hearts and the History of Art Education

DSC_0142The course I’m teaching on the history of art education explored the history of holiday arts in school last week. Just in time for V-Day. Students had interesting discussions, based on our readings and their classroom experiences, about whether, to what extent, and how the holidays might to play a role in the art curriculum today. Not surprisingly, there was a mix of responses.

19th century schools operated seasonally and so the holidays were important benchmarks in the academic year. It made sense to bring them into the school as a way of marking time with students whose lives, and livelihoods, were also tied to the seasons. During the industrial revolution, holiday arts served as a respite from day-to-day routines, and as motivation for students trying to conform to a more and more systems-driven society. Holiday projects were also used as a way of acculturating immigrant children to traditions of the dominant culture (read European-descendant and Christian).

But, “contemporary recommendations for a balanced, multifaceted art education suggest that holidays and related arts and crafts should be neither an organizing principle nor a major focus of the art program, whether taught by a generalist or specialist” (Stankiewicz, 2001, p. 68). I agree with this statement and have worked most of my professional life in accordance with it. However, as I have written about extensively in the past, over the years, I have some to embrace holiday arts and crafts in my home life and art education of my own children. Today I had an experience that could relate to classroom practice as well.

I abide by the Charles Schultz philosophy of holiday gifting, handmade is best. And so over the years I have made lots of Valentine’s with the older kids, mostly Rosa. This year, for the first time, Cora was celebrating the holiday at school, so we got a project going. We used air dry clay to make heart shapes into which she pressed all kinds of materials to create patterns and texture – forks and spoons, a potato masher, seashells, old perfection pieces, a toothpick. She painted them, and added glitter before we glued magnets to the back. She got lots of compliments, and was the only kid with something homemade to share. (Yes, I’m bragging.)

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After watching Charlie Brown’s Valentine specials with her G-Ma last night, Cora woke up ready to cut some paper. So we did. She got great practice cutting along a line and had a chance to try using the scissors in her right hand as well as her left, which she typically favors. She glued the hearts together to make a few of these.

IMG_9354As she was cutting and gluing, I was sewing a pillow cover. When she was finished with her collages, she asked if she could use the machine. She made about 25 passes before we got distracted and moved on, but by the end of the session, she was independently lowering and raising the presser foot and needle and cutting her line so she could start again. Not bad for a four-year old.

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So while I’m not prepared to advocate a return to our roots in which “every day [was] a festival” (Stankiewicz, 2001, p. 67), I am convinced that a symbol like the heart or a star, or product such as the valentine or ornament, could serve as a vehicle for material exploration and practice. I’m sure some of the T.A.B. adherents reading this will have experience in this department. Any advice for others interested in using holidays as meaningful motivators for student learning?

Holiday Crafting with Teens

Readers of this blog will remember, I don’t come by Christmas naturally. I learned to live with the holiday because I married a man who grew up with it and who loves the spirit of the season – the Chex mix, the Vince Guaraldi Trio, lots of pretty packages under the tree. I’ve written about my relationship with the whole phenomena before – both as a Jewish parent and art educator (Type “Christmas” in the search bar for all the links. There are too many to list here without boring you which just goes to show I’ve given a lot of thought to the subject.)

A few years back now George gave up on Santa and Rosa wasn’t far behind. Now they enjoy playing up the myth for Cora who is just beginning to understand, as much as the daughter of a Jewish mother can. Of course they still love to tear open presents Christmas morning, but they are no longer waking us before the sun rises to do so.

It seems somewhat ironic that just as I started to embrace the holiday and the traditions we’ve made around them, the big kids interest faded. Making cut-outs used to be something we did together from start to finish. It was a multi-day affair. These days they come in at the final hour to smear a little frosting and shake a few sprinkles on top.

Realizing this isn’t just about lack of interest but also lack of time, I determined to plan ahead this year. Drawing on my skills as an art educator, I devised a plan to capture their interest and lure them back. I set-up a Pinterest board to gather cool ideas for projects and shared it with them. I gathered supplies in advance so I would be prepared with activities on days they were with us rather than having to run to the store. And I made a calendar. On this weekend’s agenda: duct tape star ornaments and beeswax candles. I thought it was a pretty cool plan. I was partially right.

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I wound up making this first round of stars myself but I’m hopeful that others will join me at some point. Both the kids have embraced duct tape as a medium in the past and thought these looked really cool so I’ve got that going for me. I hope we’ll make a bunch so we can spread them out around the tree.

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Rosa has recently been asking to burn candles in her room. She jumped at the chance to make some herself. Watching her melt the big blocks of beeswax and pour the piping hot liquid into old glasses Cora and I picked up at the thrift store was one of those alchemical things, like developing photos in a darkroom. I’m psyched to pass these out to some of the folks on my gift list and I know she is too. She said so on Instagram.

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Our Craftiest Christmas To Date

Ellen Dissanayake (1995) famously suggested that art is the act of “making special.” From that standpoint, I cannot be more satisfied with our family’s crafty Christmas this year. Folks were making things around here for a week and it was wonderful. (Read more about it.) I was proud as a mother. I was engaged as an art educator, facilitating as much as seemed necessary to keep Santa’s workshop operating at maximum velocity. Makes me wish, for the first time in my entire life, that it could be Christmas everyday.

George the Sculpey Charmer

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Dan stole my heart by proving, once again, that he is an artist through and through.
Vintage guitars on wood veneer with freehand drawn detailing.

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Cora-crafted wrapping paper with her personal signature.DSC_0007

The contents of the box. Aluminum foil bead bracelet, from Kid Made Modern.
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Our third (or fourth??) annual handmade gift exchange for adults in the family rocked.
(back to front) Charley Harper inspired sandpaper paintings, wood box, fudge, oil painting of a cow on a slice of wood, guitar magnets, reusable snacks sacks and sandwich wrap, handkerchiefs embroidered with internal organs.

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