Picturebooks on the Potty: Vol. 3, No. 6

It’s been a long while since I wrote one of these columns. It isn’t that we aren’t reading! We read like crazy this winter, but I was TOTALLY insane at work and didn’t have time to blog about any of it. That said, I dedicate this post to my department chair, Craig Roland, who recommended Home, by Carson Willis during one of the million and one meetings we had with students last month.


One of the greatest parts of my job is the opportunity to learn alongside my students. Sometimes they teach me things, sometimes I learn from my colleagues as they are teaching. Craig draws on a wide range of resources when speaking with students which I  appreciate. Home is a perfect example.

I don’t remember the exact context of Craig’s suggestion and it doesn’t much matter. The book is a good illustration of a work of art that explores a big idea. Big, or enduring ideas “comprise concepts that have drawn the attention of humans through the ages” (Stewart and Walker, 2005, p. 17).  We encourage students to build art education curriculum around big ideas throughout the Art Education program at the University of Florida and I plan to use this book in the future to help students better grasp the concept and consider ways to utilize it with students. Parents of young children and other educators might also find it inspiring.

Big ideas are often approached through the discussion of questions like:
What is a home?
How would it feel to live in that home?
What makes your home different from other homes?

The cover of Home alone could launch many questions, leading teachers and students in various directions as they connect the theme with their own experiences, books they’ve read, and cultures they are studying.

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This is one of those picturebooks that could be given to an adult to read and reflect on just as easily as a child. The illustrations are engaging – visually and conceptually. Cora and I spent a long time looking at each one, talking about the content and the style. The one about The Little Old Lady who lived in a shoe was one of her favorites. This is just an excerpt….

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We did take exception to this page:

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The so-called clean home didn’t look clean to us so much as it looked boring or unoccupied. Everything seems to have a purpose and a place in the messy house, even the jump rope in the front yard, the bathtub in the garden, and the cinderblock holding up the front porch. But overall, the artist captured a wide range of homes (including her own studio filled with references to the book itself) and had us looking and imagining who lived in them and what it would like to join them.

After we finished reading, I interviewed Cora about our home and wrote her responses in a notebook we’ve been keeping this year to document her thinking and learning. Here’s excerpts from the interview:

Me: Cora, where is your home?
Cora: (thinking)
Me: Is it on the moon?
Cora: No. On Earth, you sil’. [Sil’ is her shorthand for saying silly.]
Me: Is your house in the city or the country?
Cora: The city. I think. Do you think that’s the truth?
Me: Yes. But what makes you think so?
Cora: Because it’s noisy. And there are lots of cars on High Street.
Me: What kind of house do we live in?
Cora: We live in a regular house. A house.
Me: What’s a regular house?
Cora: Just a regular house.
Me: So not a castle or something like that?
Cora: Yeah.
Me: What’s different about your house and Maya’s house?
Cora: We have a dog and she has cats. My house is darker because it has more curtains.
Me: What else makes our house darker? Look outside? What do you see? What would you see if you were at Maya’s?
Cora: Other houses closer together… Street lights.
Me: What else do you want to tell me about our house? What makes it special?
Cora: My house is very old because it used to be grandma’s. That what I like about it. She lives next door now and I like that too.

Next step, mapping our house and making some drawings of it.

Stewart, M. G. & Walker, S.R. (2005). Rethinking curriculum in art. Worcester, MA: Davis.

 

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Picturebooks on the Potty: Vol. 3, No. 1

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As I dropped yet another unread novel into the return bin at the library this morning, it occurred to me that this column is three years old. I started it after writing for what seemed like the billionth time on some social media profile that the last book I read was a picturebook not some New York Times bestseller for grown-ups or Oprah reading club suggestion.

Time flies when you’re raising a little one. But some things don’t change that quickly. I’m still sharing the bulk of my leisure reading time with Cora. However, what we’re reading is starting to change.

For her 4th birthday, my aunt sent Cora a bunch of books including two chapter books,  both by E.B. White. I read Charlotte’s Web when I was a kid. The Trumpet of the Swan was new to me. Both are great stories that demonstrate White’s love and respect for animals of all kinds. Cora listened to them intently, back-to-back. A few months later, after a journey into The Secret Garden, we’re rereading them again, simultaneously. Per Cora’s request, we read a chapter in one, then a chapter from the other. She’s picking up on similarities in the story lines and reminding me of things that will happen a few chapters down the road. It’s amazing to see how she’s soaking it all up.

Amazing and a little sad. While one of the things I advocate for in this column is that readers of all ages ought to be picturebook readers, part of me knows that as Cora gets older we’ll read fewer of these stories and spend more time with long books with few pictures. (Side note: Having the books in the house for Cora and watching how the older kids gravitate towards them is a reminder that people will read what you make available and it’s up to me to be sure all our diets continue to include a healthy serving of Caldecott contenders.)

For now, Cora still looks forward to the pages in the chapter books with illustrations.

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I can remember than feeling. And not just from when I was practicing reading and a page with a picture meant fewer words I had to struggle through. The pictures helped me see the rest of the description more vividly. Some would say they were a crutch, that White’s writing doesn’t need images. I guess I think of them more like training wheels, bolstering young readers as they embark on new reading challenges, in this case, reading stories of more than 200 pages.

But they really are more than that. Garth Williams’ illustrations are well worth our attention; imaginative pen and ink drawings, my personal medium of choice for years. Click here to see some of the original drawings complete with page markings and proof numbers. (I love to see those traces of process.)

As we embark on the third volume of this column, be prepared to see a shift in some of the content. I still plan to write primarily about picturebooks, but there’s likely to be some graphic novels and illustrated chapter books in the mix as well. Regardless, I hope to keep thinking about the role books with pictures play in creative and intellectual development.

Picturebooks on the Potty: Vol. 2, No. 14

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This subject of this issue of Picturebooks on the Potty – Goldie Blox and the Spinning Machine – is one part book, one part educational toy, and one part girl power battle cry. The book tells the story of a girl named Goldie who builds a machine to spin her toys modeled after the ballerina in her music box. The goal: Get more girls to see science, technology, engineering, and math as arenas for creative play, exploration, and potential careers.

To be honest, The Spinning Machine wouldn’t have made this column as a stand alone picturebook. The story just isn’t that captivating. (You can find some of my recommendations for picturebooks about kids who build stuff here and here.) What Goldie Blox does that these other books don’t, however, is provide materials for readers to build alongside Goldie. This is good news for parents as well as kids. No pressure to gather supplies and mine Pinterest for DIY project ideas. Our kids, boys included, can start tinkering immediately.

But girls are the primary audience for Goldie Blox. Combining their love of storytelling with all kids’ tendency to come up with new ways to play with their toys, the makers hope to reach millions of girls who are would-be engineers but, “just might not know it yet.” After only one reading, Crafty Cora has spent hours playing independently with the peg board, washers, axels, spools, blox, and snap-on figurines that came with the book. She has set the parts up in various configurations and made up scenarios for each scene.

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Cora wasn’t the only girl around here excited about Goldie Blox. Her older sister, grandmother, aunt, and I have all spent time messing around with the kit. In this way it’s been a cross-generational activity, one which each participant approaches a bit differently, thus demonstrating that there’s more than one way to spin a sloth.

As far as I’m concerned, Goldie Blox has already earned her keep. Still, I’m eager to see what else she might inspire.

Picturebooks on the Potty: Vol. 2, No. 12

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Here’s a little collection for October featuring witches, monsters, and some incredible costumes.

I am working on a post in my mind about the pop star-like crushes I have on a few picture book author-illustrators at the moment. Peter Brown is one of them. I wrote about The Curious Gardenhis homage to the NYC Highline Park, last year. His imagery has a fresh, contemporary feel about it and many of his stories fall a bit outside the parameters of everyday life. See for instance Children Make Terrible Pets. My Teacher is a Monster (2014) touches on both back to school and Halloween themes. Perfect fall reading.

Fraidy Zoo (Heder, 2013) isn’t about Halloween either, but I highly recommend it for any family looking for DIY costume ideas. When Little T’s family postpones their trip to the zoo to try to figure out what’s scaring her about going, they spend the day transforming themselves into a colorful menagerie of animals through some surprisingly creative repurposing of household materials.

Finally, A Very Witchy Spelling Bee (Shannon/Fearing, 2013) will get you in the magic-making spirit of the season. It includes lots of clever plays on words that introduce young readers to the nuances of spelling. There is one mean old witch but even she is a friend by the end.

Picturebooks on the Potty: Vol. 2, No. 7

It’s spring! Here are a few books we’re reading, when we’re not out in the garden planting and weeding and watering.

Jamie O’Rourke and the Big Potato (DePaola, 1992) –
Regular readers know we are big fans of DePaola’s signature character Strega Nona. If I hadn’t written about her harvest story a short while ago, it would be on this list for sure. This retelling of an Irish folktale tells a somewhat similar tale of a lazy gardener surprised by the bounty he brings forth from the land. Parents in need of a moment might enjoy sharing this YouTube reading with their kids if they can’t easily get their hands on a bound copy.

Sophie’s Squash (MIller/Wilsdorf, 2013)
This book follows Sophie as she adopts a squash from the farmers market that her parents had intended to cook up for dinner. Sophie tends to her “baby” day and night, bringing her all over town and tucking her into her crib. Reminds me of the home economics project folks did way back when in which we’d carry an egg or a sack of sugar around for a week to get a sense of what it would be like to be a parent. Now that I have a real live baby, I truly understand how absurd that exercise was. But Bernice the Butternut was as real to Sophie as any baby doll might be. The story cleverly wraps itself back to a new beginning while subtly educating readers about the magic of saving seeds and composting.

Tops and Bottoms (Stevens, 1995)
I love the illustrations, as well as the story, in this Caldecott award-winning book. As the dust jacket suggests, they highlight the author’s “talent for painting vegetables of all sorts.” They also inform young readers about the ways vegetables grow and introduce the fact that some plants are prized for what grows above the ground, others for what is buried down below. Again, a YouTube reading is available for those building a library of books on the web for young readers.

Hope you find inspiration to get growing from one of these great books!

 

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Picturebooks on the Potty: Vol. 1, No. 9

I don’t usually repost other people’s, but when picturebooks make the front page of Sunday’s New York Times, it seems appropriate. Check out this article that addresses form, function, and economics of Picturebooks for our youngest “readers.”

Note: I got to see a few of these new classics in person last week at my dear friends’ beautiful shop in Asheville, NC. If you’re nearby, stop by the Baggie Goose!